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Millions of people have been left homeless and displaced by the severe floods in Pakistan and are running from door to door for help. So a Hindu temple in a small village in Balochistan has provided food and shelter to about 200 to 300 flood-affected people, mostly Muslims. Baba Madhodas Temple, situated on high ground in Jalal Khan village of Kutchi district, has remained relatively safe from flood waters and is becoming a safe haven for the flood affected people.

Baba Madhodas used to see people through the prism of humanity instead of religion and caste.
According to the locals, Baba Madhodas was a pre-Partition Hindu saint who was cherished by the Muslims and Hindus of the area alike. Iltaf Buzdar, a frequent visitor to the village from Bhag Nari tehsil, says that he used to travel on camels. Buzdar says that according to the stories narrated by his parents, the saint transcended religious boundaries. The saints looked through the prism of humanity rather than the people’s caste and faith. The place of worship frequented by the Hindu worshipers of Balochistan is made of concrete and covers a large area. Since it is situated on high ground, it remained relatively safe from flood waters.

100 rooms in the temple, people also come for pilgrimage
The report states that most members of the Hindu community in Jalal Khan have migrated to other towns in Kutchi for employment and other opportunities, but some families remain in the temple premises to take care of it. Ratan Kumar, 55, a shopkeeper from Bhag Nari tehsil, is currently in charge of the temple. The report quoted him as saying that the temple has more than a hundred rooms as a large number of people from Balochistan and Sindh come here for pilgrimage every year.

Apart from people, animals have also been given shelter
The report said that at least 200-300 people, mostly Muslims and their livestock, were given shelter on the premises and looked after by Hindu families. Initially, the area was completely cut off from the rest of the district. The displaced said that they were provided ration by helicopter, but when they went inside the temple, they were being fed by the Hindu community. Apart from the local people, Hindus also keep goats and sheep along with other animals, said Israr Mugheri, a doctor of Jalal Khan, who has set up a medical camp inside the temple. Announcements were made over loudspeakers by local Hindus, calling on Muslims to go to the temple to take shelter, he added.

Expansion

Millions of people have been left homeless and displaced by the severe floods in Pakistan and are running from door to door for help. So a Hindu temple in a small village in Balochistan has provided food and shelter to about 200 to 300 flood-affected people, mostly Muslims. Baba Madhodas Temple, situated on high ground in Jalal Khan village of Kutchi district, has remained relatively safe from flood waters and is becoming a safe haven for the flood affected people.

Baba Madhodas used to see people through the prism of humanity instead of religion and caste.

According to the locals, Baba Madhodas was a pre-Partition Hindu saint who was cherished by the Muslims and Hindus of the area alike. Iltaf Buzdar, a frequent visitor to the village from Bhag Nari tehsil, says that he used to travel on camels. Buzdar says that according to the stories narrated by his parents, the saint transcended religious boundaries. The saints looked through the prism of humanity rather than the people’s caste and faith. The place of worship frequented by the Hindu worshipers of Balochistan is made of concrete and covers a large area. Since it is situated on high ground, it remained relatively safe from flood waters.

100 rooms in the temple, people also come for pilgrimage

The report states that most members of the Hindu community in Jalal Khan have migrated to other towns in Kutchi for employment and other opportunities, but some families remain in the temple premises to take care of it. Ratan Kumar, 55, a shopkeeper from Bhag Nari tehsil, is currently in charge of the temple. The report quoted him as saying that the temple has more than a hundred rooms as a large number of people from Balochistan and Sindh come here for pilgrimage every year.

Apart from people, animals have also been given shelter

The report said that at least 200-300 people, mostly Muslims and their livestock, were given shelter on the premises and looked after by Hindu families. Initially, the area was completely cut off from the rest of the district. The displaced said that they were provided ration by helicopter, but when they went inside the temple, they were being fed by the Hindu community. Apart from the local people, Hindus also keep goats and sheep along with other animals, said Israr Mugheri, a doctor of Jalal Khan, who has set up a medical camp inside the temple. Announcements were made over loudspeakers by local Hindus, calling on Muslims to go to the temple to take shelter, he added.

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