Landmark Court Ruling Blocks Taiwan Man Extradition To China

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In a ‘historic’ ruling, Europe’s human rights court has blocked the extradition of a Taiwanese man to China. According to media reports, the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) has unanimously found that the extradition of a Taiwanese national to China would put her at significant risk of ill-treatment and torture. The courts in Poland had previously approved the extradition.

In October, a French court ruled that a Taiwanese national accused of telecommunications fraud should not be extradited from Poland to China because he could face ill-treatment or torture, Voice of America (VOA) reported. And he may not have access to a fair trial. The judges also ruled on five years’ detention of Hung Tao Liu while he appealed that the extradition request was illegal. The VOA said the decision could come into effect in January.

Liu’s lawyer at the ECHR, Polish law professor Marcin Gorski, told VOA that “overall the outcome of the case is that basically regardless of your personal situation – whether you have some kind of opposition in China Whether a political activist involved in the activities or not… you should not be extradited to China. Basically there is a possibility that any person handed over will be treated badly.”

Madrid-based rights group Safeguard Defenders said the landmark decision would mean it would be almost impossible to re-extradite suspects living in European countries to China. Safeguard Defenders further stated that “compared to most or all of Europe’s government actions to date, it is difficult to say how influential this decision may be, and how it has in one stroke protected the basic rights being undermined by China”. has made strong efforts to protect human rights, as enshrined in the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR).

Liu’s extradition was approved by Polish legal authorities, including the Supreme Court of Poland. The appellant submitted that extraditing him to China would be subject to torture and ill-treatment as well as denial of the right to a fair trial, and would be violative of Articles 3 and 6 of the ECHR in this regard.

The Madrid-based rights group said that “this decision is set to guide all local European countries’ court decisions on extradition to China in the future, as well as governments”. Approval will have to be given keeping in mind that in such cases there will be no possibility of court approval.

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In a ‘historic’ ruling, Europe’s human rights court has blocked the extradition of a Taiwanese man to China. According to media reports, the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) has unanimously found that the extradition of a Taiwanese national to China would put her at significant risk of ill-treatment and torture. The courts in Poland had previously approved the extradition.


In October, a French court ruled that a Taiwanese national accused of telecommunications fraud should not be extradited from Poland to China because he could face ill-treatment or torture, Voice of America (VOA) reported. And he may not have access to a fair trial. The judges also ruled on five years’ detention of Hung Tao Liu while he appealed that the extradition request was illegal. The VOA said the decision could come into force in January.

Liu’s lawyer at the ECHR, Polish law professor Marcin Gorski, told VOA that “overall the outcome of the case is that basically regardless of your personal situation – whether you have some kind of opposition in China Whether a political activist involved in the activities or not… you should not be extradited to China. Basically there is a possibility that any person handed over will be treated badly.”

Madrid-based rights group Safeguard Defenders said the landmark decision would mean it would be almost impossible to re-extradite suspects living in European countries to China. Safeguard Defenders further stated that “compared to most or all of Europe’s government actions to date, it is difficult to say how influential this decision may be, and how it has in one stroke protected the basic rights being undermined by China”. has made strong efforts to protect human rights, as enshrined in the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR).

Liu’s extradition was approved by Polish legal authorities, including the Supreme Court of Poland. The appellant submitted that extraditing him to China would be subject to torture and ill-treatment as well as denial of the right to a fair trial, and would be violative of Articles 3 and 6 of the ECHR in this regard.


The Madrid-based rights group said that “this decision is set to guide all local European countries’ court decisions on extradition to China in the future, as well as governments”. Approval will have to be given keeping in mind that in such cases there will be no possibility of court approval.

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