Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus

Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus
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WHO In UNGA: The corona epidemic is not completely over, but its end seems near. This was stated by Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director General of WHO during the UNGA meeting held in New York.

He began his talk by saying that here at the United Nations General Assembly in New York, one of the frequently asked questions to me is, where do we stand? Is the pandemic over? In our media briefings over the past two weeks, I have said that the pandemic is not over, but the end is in sight. Both these things are true.

He said that being able to see the end does not mean that the end is over. Yes, we are in a better position than ever before. The number of weekly deaths due to the pandemic continues to decline, and is now only 10 per cent from its peak in January 2021. Two-thirds of the world’s population has been vaccinated, including three-quarters of health workers and older people.

WHO Director-General Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said that restrictions have been lifted in most countries and life is looking as it was before the pandemic. But to have 10,000 deaths in a week, this is too much, that too when most of these deaths could have been prevented. Although immunity has increased at the population level, there is still a lag in the duration of mass vaccination, especially in low- and middle-income countries.

He added that the virus is still spreading, changing more with the current risk of more dangerous forms emerging. We’ve spent nearly two and a half years in a long, dark tunnel, and we’re starting to glimpse the light at the end of that tunnel. But it still has a long way to go, and the tunnel is still dark, with many obstacles that can haunt us, if we don’t pay attention.

He said we all need hope that we can—and we will—reach the end of the tunnel and leave the pandemic behind. But we are not there yet, we are still in the tunnel, and we will reach the end only by focusing on the path ahead, and moving forward with purpose and care. The situation of the pandemic has been that no one is safe until everyone is safe.

Along with this, he pointed out to follow the rules like using every resource according to the need, staying safe, maintaining distance, wearing masks and staying in a ventilated place. He said that we have to keep our medical equipment clean, beat the epidemic through vaccination, testing and treatment. In low-income countries, only 19 percent of the population has been vaccinated.

In view of this, I welcome today’s announcement from the Global Fund that it has signed an agreement with Pfizer to facilitate access for countries to the antiviral nirmatrelvir/ritonavir, or paxlovid, through the ACT Accelerator Huh. On Friday, I will attend two meetings of world leaders at the United Nations General Assembly here.

One hosted by United States Secretary of State Antony Blinken, and one convened by UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres. These meetings are to take stock of where we are and to foster strong political support for equitable access to tools to treat COVID-19.

After this, he also spoke with facts about the situation in Uganda, the condition of labs in the world and monkeypox. Regarding Ebola, he told that so far 16 patients have been found, these are being examined with care, so that more people infected with Ebola can be detected.

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WHO In UNGA: The corona epidemic is not completely over, but its end seems near. This was stated by Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director General of WHO during the UNGA meeting held in New York.

He began his talk by saying that here at the United Nations General Assembly in New York, one of the frequently asked questions to me is, where do we stand? Is the pandemic over? In our media briefings over the past two weeks, I have said that the pandemic is not over, but the end is in sight. Both these things are true.

He said that being able to see the end does not mean that the end is over. Yes, we are in a better position than ever before. The number of weekly deaths due to the pandemic continues to decline, and is now only 10 per cent from its peak in January 2021. Two-thirds of the world’s population has been vaccinated, including three-quarters of health workers and older people.

WHO Director-General Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said that restrictions have been lifted in most countries and life is looking as it was before the pandemic. But to have 10,000 deaths in a week, this is too much, that too when most of these deaths could have been prevented. Although immunity has increased at the population level, there is still a lag in the duration of mass vaccination, especially in low- and middle-income countries.

He added that the virus is still spreading, changing more with the current risk of more dangerous forms emerging. We’ve spent nearly two and a half years in a long, dark tunnel, and we’re starting to glimpse the light at the end of that tunnel. But it still has a long way to go, and the tunnel is still dark, with many obstacles that can haunt us, if we don’t pay attention.

He said we all need hope that we can—and we will—reach the end of the tunnel and leave the pandemic behind. But we are not there yet, we are still in the tunnel, and we will reach the end only by focusing on the path ahead, and moving forward with purpose and care. The situation of the pandemic has been that no one is safe until everyone is safe.

Along with this, he pointed out to follow the rules like using every resource according to the need, staying safe, maintaining distance, wearing masks and staying in a ventilated place. He said that we have to keep our medical equipment clean, beat the epidemic through vaccination, testing and treatment. In low-income countries, only 19 percent of the population has been vaccinated.

In view of this, I welcome today’s announcement from the Global Fund that it has signed an agreement with Pfizer to facilitate access for countries to the antiviral nirmatrelvir/ritonavir, or paxlovid, through the ACT Accelerator Huh. On Friday, I will attend two meetings of world leaders at the United Nations General Assembly here.

One hosted by United States Secretary of State Antony Blinken, and one convened by UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres. These meetings are to take stock of where we are and to foster strong political support for equitable access to tools to treat COVID-19.

After this, he also spoke with facts about the situation in Uganda, the condition of labs in the world and monkeypox. Regarding Ebola, he told that so far 16 patients have been found, these are being examined with care, so that more people infected with Ebola can be detected.

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